Are Samosas Gluten Free? (& GF Recipe)

Last Updated on April 22, 2022

Today, we’re going to be answering the question: are samosas gluten free? And taking a look at the best gluten-free samosas that we have available when following a gluten-free diet. Whether you want to try making your own, or you’d prefer to pick them up ready-made – there are plenty of options. But are samosas typically gluten-free? What are samosas usually made from? Let’s take a closer look.

What Are Samosas?

Samosas can come one of two ways, either fried or baked. However, the ones you’ll find in your local Indian restaurant will usually be fried (the best way!). It’s a filling of vegetables and/or meat, encased in a pastry. Usually, samosas triangular. However, you may come across them in various different shapes.

What Are Samosas

Read more about: What Spices Have Gluten? and Where To Buy GF Spices

What Cornmeal Is Gluten Free? Glute...
What Cornmeal Is Gluten Free? Gluten Free Cornmeal Brands

Are Samosas Gluten Free?

Unfortunately, samosas are not typically gluten-free. As you can probably tell from the list of ingredients, one of the main components of samosas is the pastry. Although pastry can be made gluten-free, typical samosas will not be gluten-free, and they will contain wheat flour.

However, try not to feel too disheartened as there are plenty of gluten-free alternatives when it comes to samosas.

Gluten Free Samosa Recipe

If you’re looking to make the easiest homemade samosas, then look no further. Moon and Spoon and Yum have the most delicious Easy Gluten-Free Samosa recipe, which we’ll be taking a look at today.

Ingredients

The ingredients you’ll need for this recipe are:

for the pastry:

  • 1/4 cup of water
  • 1 tablespoon of olive oil
  • 1/4 teaspoon of salt
  • 1 cup of tapioca flour
  • 1/4 teaspoon of baking powder

for the filling:

  • 3 russet potatoes (peel and cube them)
  • 1 chopped carrot
  • 1 cup of peas
  • 2 tablespoons of oil (any)
  • 1 chopped onion
  • 4 garlic cloves (grated)
  • 1/3 cup of chopped cilantro
  • 2 tablespoons of lemon juice
  • 1 teaspoon of ground cumin
  • 1 teaspoon of curry powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon of garam masala
  • 1/2 teaspoon of coconut sugar
  • 1/4 teaspoon of red chili flakes
  • 1/4 teaspoon of black pepper
  • a pinch of salt

Recipe

Now all you need to do is:

Step 1: Prepare and Cook the Veggies

Using a large pan, cover your carrots and potatoes with water. Boil and then leave to simmer for around 15 minutes. At this point, they should both be tender. Now add the peas to the pan. Remove from heat and it’s time to move onto the rest of your filling

Step 2: More Filling!

In a pan with oil, cook your onion and garlic for around 5 minutes. At this point, drain the potato mixture and place it back in the pan. Add your garlic, onion, lemon juice, cilantro, and spices to the potato mix. Mash until you’ve reached the consistency you desire. Some people like chunky filling and others like smooth – there is no right or wrong. Season with salt and pepper and set aside.

Step 3: Making the Dough

Firstly, preheat your oven to 375F and line a sheet with parchment paper. Now add your salt, oil, and water to a pan and boil. Once boiling, add the flour and baking powder. Mix well until completely absorbed. Leave for a few minutes before you start touching the dough as it’ll be very hot. Once cooled, put the dough onto your lined sheet.

Step 4: Perfecting the Samosa Shape

Now you have your dough, knead until you have one large ball. Now divide the dough into eight equal ball-shaped pieces. Use a rolling pan (or your hands) to create a 4-inch circle with each ball. Now cut each of the circles in half (this will make 16 semi-circles).

Step 5: Fill Your Samosas

Now place a small amount of your filling into the center of each of your 16 half circles. Take a corner of the dough and place it over the filling. Now do the same with the other corner of the dough (overlapping). Press down to seal. Now brush each samosa with a small amount of oil and place it onto your sheet.

Step 6: Bake and Enjoy!

As you may not have a frier, and deep frying foods in a pan can be messy – we’ll be looking at baking the samosas today (but you can fry them). Bake for around 30 minutes, ensuring you turn them halfway through. Leave to cool once crispy and serve. Enjoy! They don’t take long to make at all, and they’re absolutely delicious.


Read more about: Does Indian Food Have Gluten?

Gluten Free Samosa Brands

While there isn’t a huge selection of gluten-free samosa brands, there are a few in the UK and US that I would recommend. In the UK, I would highly suggest checking out Mandira’s Kitchen. Not only are their samosas gluten-free, but also suitable for vegetarians and vegans too. If you’re in the US, Quesava offers vegan samosas too, which are made using cassava flour. They arrive frozen and only take around 10-15 minutes in the oven!

Conclusion

I hope this article has helped to answer the question: are samosas gluten-free? And also give you a great gluten-free samosa recipe to try at home. While it does need quite a large selection of ingredients, many of which are spices and will last for many batches of homemade samosas! I would highly recommend making your own – nothing beats homemade samosas, with mango chutney or raita dip.

Do you know of any other gluten-free samosa brands or recipes? If so, please feel free to let me know in the comments below, as I would love to hear about them. Sharing is caring!

FAQs

What Are Samosas Made of?

The ingredients in samosas can vary massively, depending on where you get them from. However, the most common ingredients are flour, salt, water and oil for the pastry. And the filling usually consists of carrots, onions, peas and potatoes, along with a variety of herbs and spices. One thing's for sure - samosas are absolutely delicious! 

Are Vegetable Samosa Gluten Free?

Unfortunately, whether a samosa is filled with vegetables or meat, it will not be gluten free. This is because the filling itself (whether meat or vegetables) is typically gluten free. It's the pastry that encases the filling that is not.